Custom Search

News

Sunday 01 December 2002

Fluticasone versus salmeterol/low-dose fluticasone for long-term asthma control.

By: Heyneman CA, Crafts R, Holland J, Arnold AD.

Ann Pharmacother 2002 Dec;36(12):1944-9

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relative clinical superiority of increasing the dose of fluticasone propionate versus the addition of salmeterol to low-dose fluticasone propionate for long-term asthma control. DATA SOURCES: Literature was identified by a MEDLINE search (1966-October 2002). Key search terms included asthma, inhalation, corticosteroid, beta-adrenergic agonist, and combination drug therapy. DATA SYNTHESIS: Current guidelines for long-term control of asthma include treatment with either inhaled corticosteroids (medium dose) or inhaled corticosteroids (low to medium dose) in combination with a long-acting bronchodilator. Previous studies evaluating salmeterol or formoterol combination therapy with beclomethasone or budesonide have generally produced superior results compared with increasing the dose of the inhaled corticosteroid. Four recent controlled clinical trials have compared the clinical utility of fluticasone propionate monotherapy versus salmeterol/low-dose fluticasone propionate for long-term asthma control in patients with moderate to severe persistent asthma. Based on spirometry data, rescue albuterol use, and symptom scores, the addition of salmeterol to low-dose fluticasone propionate was superior to increasing the dose of fluticasone propionate. CONCLUSIONS: Based on improvements in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, peak expiratory flow, and symptom control, the addition of salmeterol to low-dose fluticasone propionate provides better control of asthma than increasing the dose of fluticasone propionate.

Use of this site is subject to the following terms of use