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Tuesday 01 February 2000

The effect of regular salbutamol on lung function and bronchial responsiveness in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

By: Koh YY, Park Y, Jeong JH, Kim CK, Min YG, Chi JG.

Chest 2000 Feb;117(2):427-33

STUDY OBJECTIVE: There is growing evidence that regular beta(2)-agonist use in patients with asthma is associated with decreased airway caliber and increased bronchial responsiveness. The aim of this study was to determine whether regular treatment with beta(2)-agonists induces changes in lung function and bronchial responsiveness in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. PATIENTS: Nineteen children with primary ciliary dyskinesia. INTERVENTIONS: Subjects received inhaled salbutamol or identical placebo (2 x 100 microg qid) for periods of 6 weeks with a wash-out period of 4 weeks. Measurements and results: FEV(1) was measured before and 3 weeks and 6 weeks after salbutamol or placebo treatment. High-dose methacholine inhalation tests were performed before and 6 weeks after each treatment. The provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% fall in FEV(1) (PC(20)) and maximal airway narrowing (MDeltaFFEV(1)) was measured. No significant change in FEV(1) was observed during the salbutamol or placebo periods. No significant differences in the parameters of bronchial responsiveness (PC(20) and MDeltaFFEV(1)) were noted as the result of either salbutamol or placebo treatment. CONCLUSION: Our data have shown that salbutamol, inhaled regularly for 6 weeks, did not cause either a decline in lung function or an increase in bronchial responsiveness in subjects with primary ciliary dyskinesia.

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